Spreadshirt Designer Linking How To

spreadshirtdesigner_linking

As many of you Spreadsters out there know that if you have a premium account you get a free custom designer were customers can design their own clothing. I sell about as much if not more through it than I do my pre-made shirts. In this article I’m going to quickly show you how you can:

  • Link to a specific product so that it appears when the designer is loaded
  • Change the color of products
  • Call for a design to be preloaded
  • Change the color of the design
  • Tell the designer to load a specific category such as baby & family designs

So let’s begin shall we.

Here is a typical link to your designer might look like once you’ve renamed it such as I have.
http://nekkidtness.spreadshirt.com

Here is what the modified link looks like which loads a child’s t-shirt with the baby & family design section.
http://nekkidness.spreadshirt.com/us/US/Shop/Index/Index/productType/442/productColor/1/design/3830646/designColor1/2/department/3/designCategory/1000010/

I know the first thing that came to your mind is “could that link be any longer?” and the answer is yes it can. But for now I’m going to keep it short and down to the basics.

Let’s take the above link apart and see what each part does.

http://nekkidness.spreadshirt.com
This is the basic link I have to my shop. I called it nekkidness by going in to the administrator section of my Spreadshirt account and then clicking Shops and then Linking.

/us/US/Shop/Index/Index/
This is standard and always appears in the linking structure. I’m assuming it changes based on your language or whether you’re at Spreadshirt.com or Spreadshirt.net which is the EU version.

productType/442/
This code defines what product from the huge selection Spreadshirt offers is going to be pulled in to the designer once it loads. It will be the first shirt the customer sees. The number 442 is the actual ID number for the clothing. I’ll explain later on how to retrieve item IDs.

productColor/1/
This defines what the product color is going to be. By default if you leave this field out it will use the first color Spreadshirt has assigned to the clothing. But if you want to change it you can. The number 1 represents the colors that can be used with each produce. To find out the color codes you can visit the apparel page at Spreadshirt.com

design/3830646/
Now if you have a specific design you want to load first, maybe you’re running a new featured shirt or it’s a seasonal design, you can call that design by adding design/yourdesignid. To find you’re design ID simply log in to you’re account, find the design, and it should tell you out beside it.

designColor1/2/
This code determines what color your design is going to be. In the example I am using a white shirt so I wanted the design to be black. In order to do that I added the designColor code followed by a 2 which represents black. I’ll discuss the color ID codes in my next article.

department/3/
Let’s say you wanted to link to the kids section of clothing only, as I have done above, you would do so by this code. In order to find out what ID number represents what section you can go to the Apparel section at Spreadshirt.com and on the left side there is a navigational box, hovering over the links will show you the department IDs. In this case 3 is Kids & Babies.

designCategory/1000010/
Now if you wanted to call forth a specific category of designs such as the Kids & Babies as I have done you just need to know what the category ID is for each section. Thankfully the good people at Spreadshirt such as Temple pointed me in the right direction for this. You have to go to the Spreadshirt site, click on a link such as Men, Women’s, or etc and on the next page you should see a drop down called topics. Under that drop down is a link of categories and when you hover over each one you will see the category codes. To make it easier I will put the list in my next article.

With everything said and done I hope this helps you with your designer linking or at least gives you a better understanding of how the linking functions.

productColor
About Tommy White 165 Articles
Tommy White is a Graphic Designer, Web Designer / Developer, IT Director and more, including Foodie Fanatic. "I enjoy helping others in times of need and live steadfast to the motto of paying it forward".

6 Comments

  1. Hi Tommy,

    Great Article and explanation! I did just want to correct one piece of the article. The section for productColor/1/ is actually incorrect. The color id is defined for each available color and not according to the order of the colors. White has the value of 1 and black has the value of 2, but other colors range in value, as in your example, the Toddler Tee the red color has a value of 5.

    You can locate the color id in the same manner as locating the product ids, etc, through hovering over the color square on the Apparel page.

    Thanks,
    Temple

  2. Hey,

    I realize this post is almost two years old, but I guess you never wrote a follow-up about the designColor IDs? I have tried searching the spreadshirt website, as well as their forums, but I am having no luck. Maybe you could point me in the right direction?

    Thanks,
    Scott

    • Hi Scott,

      Can you tell me what it is you’re wanting to do? The designColor1/3 (in this case 3 is the color of the design which should be navy blue) still works to the best of my knowledge. I didn’t list what each designColor represented because at one point they were different for each product. I will check to see if anything has changed since then.

  3. Hi,

    Thanks for the response. As is typical, after finding nothing searching for a few days, about half an hour after I posted that comment, I found what I was looking for. It was in a zipped PDF on the forum about “deep linking”, and I found the color codes by hovering over the swatches on this page:
    http://www.spreadshirt.com/us/US/Service/Help-1328/categoryId/19/articleId/47

    Thanks again for your help. Your shop and blog have been very helpful to me as I have been setting up my own shop.

    -Scott

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